If comedy is a calling, David Chappelle answered it at a very early age. Chappelle began his career in his native Washington, DC at the age of fourteen. As a minor, Chappelle's mother, an ordained Unitarian minister, often accompanied him to gigs. Now twenty-eight, he no longer needs a chaperone. Today, Dave's gift of laughter extends well beyond the stand-up circuit. His movie credits alone include over eleven major feature film roles.



Never forsaking his love for stand-up, Chappelle has starred in his own one-hour stand-up comedy specials on HBO and Showtime. He has appeared on over forty national programs including numerous appearances on "The Late Show with David Letterman," "Late Night with Conan O'Brien" and "Politically Incorrect" and a reoccurring role as commentator for "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno." He has covered such events as the Winter Olympics and the Tyson/Lewis fight in Memphis.



Chappelle's feature film roles are extensive and quite unique. He has worked with some of Hollywood's finest. His last movie was the Universal Pictures feature "Undercover Brother" opposite Eddie Griffin and Denise Richards. Based on the animated web series, the film follows a man who secretly works for an all Black brotherhood, and its never-ending battle against the White establishment. Chappelle plays 'Conspiracy Brother,' an intense secret agent, who finds conspiracies in the most outlandish things.



After making his feature film debut in Mel Brook's "Robin Hood: Men In Tights," Dave had the fortune of starring in two consecutive $100-million dollars-plus grossing pictures. In 1996's "The Nutty Professor," Chappelle played the obnoxious 'Def Jam' style comedian Reggie Warrington, who taunted the portly Professor Klump (Eddie Murphy). Subsequently, he appeared in the smash hit "Con Air" as Pinball Parker, a rioting convict who meets his death after being ejected from an airplane (by Nicolas Cage).



Chappelle's first major starring role was in "Half Baked," which he also co-wrote. The film is now viewed as a cult hit and considered a must-own on DVD for college kids. He played janitor Thurgood Jenkins, a creative bud who does what it takes to help a friend in need. He also delivered laughs as co-worker and confidante to Tom Hanks in "You've Got Mail." In 1999, the film "Blue Streak" teamed Chappelle with fellow comic and DC native Martin Lawrence. In the movie, Chappelle plays chain-smoking, Tulley, a jewel heist get-a-way driver with extremely bad nerves.



Chappelle has gained valuable experience and lasting memories performing in prestigious venues with such entertainment legends as Aretha Franklin at Radio City Music Hall, Richord Pryor at Symphony Hall and with Whoopi Goldberg at the Lincoln Center. But it was famed New York street comedian Charlie Barnett who helped tutor Chappelle as a performer and taught him that all great comedians must have a definitive point of view. Time-Out New York ascribes that "what is really arresting about comedian (Chappelle) is that he seems to possess that rare balance of depth and delivery, which often makes a Pryor or a Carlin." Adding, "His Jokes, all of them unapologetically about race, are painfully insightful...his natural affability allows him to sneak up from behind with the sharp stuff."



Chappelle currently lives in Ohio with his wife and two children.